A Mongolian Views America

Hillside, Ulanbaataar, Mongolia

It’s always us doing the observing, judging, describing. Time to turn the tables. Just back from dusty Ulanbaataar, Mongolia. Instead of my impressions (later), here is Boston — through the eyes of a Mongolian food-safety expert. (Pix are my snaps from Mongolia.) I must be as inaccurate on China as she is on America.

by Dr. H. Jambalma, in current issue of MIAT magazine

“In America, freedom means people deal properly with everything, in accordance with the rules and laws, which apply to everyone on an equal basis. People get on with eachother with friendliness and with a smile.”

“It is impossible to distinguish the rich and poor Americans by the clothes they wear and the food they consume. I had a chance to visit [a Rockefeller descendant’s] house. She has a medium-sized private house, by American standards, near Harvard. She passes the summer in the state Maine. In other words, they live like other common people.”

Gandan temple (Mongolians practice Tibetan Buddhism)


“The advantage in American society is that the entire population, the rich and poor, are supplied with safe food. There are no apples intended for the rich, or for the poor. It is an individual’s choice to consumer organic food or produced food. The essence of the Americans’ freedom seems to be this availability, the possibility of choice.”

Socialist realism mural, UB city library


“In Mongolia, there is little competition, the people are too peaceful. America exists due to competition. Even the secondary school children compete. They compete to gain knowledge and skills, not to get high marks. When American university students begin to study a subject, they have to read numerous books to be able to distinguish the old from the recent findings to draw a conclusion.”

Mongolia, one of earth’s last wild places


“Boston is famous for its universities… I read in a newspaper some scientists from MIT were planning to visit Mongolia. Brandeis, where I work, was established by Louis Brandeis in 1948. He is one of the top lawyers in America. He is a Jew. He founded Brandeis to compete with Harvard, because there had been a quota for Jewish young people to enroll at Harvard.”

Vista over hills, Ulanbaataar (that trap the smog)


“During graduation, the universities invite successful graduates in different fields to address the new graduates, such as world-renowned politicians, scholars or composers. Mr. Bill Clinton and the Dalai Lama visited our university. The famous violinist YoYo Ma came to Brandeis and gave us valuable advice.”

Suhbataar Sq., Government House


“Boston is not short of athletic teams compared with other cities in America. On the contrary, it exceeds them. There is a baseball team, “Red Sox,” a basketball team, “Celtics,” and a football team, “Patriots.” The Bostoners like to wear a hat with a picture of red socks, and a green shirt.”

Traditional masks, 1 of many echoes for me of Alaska


“The winter in Boston is not cold.* Usually it doesn’t snow too much. Occasionally, a lot of snow falls all of a sudden here. Cars weigh down with snow. Then the snow melts and black ice is formed on the car. The first year we were not experienced and our car weighted down with ice.”

The ger (yurt) can be seen even in the capital.


*Note that Mongolian winters are routinely 40 below zero, and it gets colder.

2 comments on “A Mongolian Views America

  1. adam says:

    .” The Bostoners like to wear a hat with a picture of red socks, and a green shirt.”
    That is such good stuff!

    Like

  2. […] A Mongolian Views America (coplansinchina.wordpress.com) […]

    Like

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